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Intrusion Map: West Midlands, early 1960s

A map showing the areas in the West Midlands region disturbed by the presence of noise and visual intrusion from major infrastructure such as motorways and A roads, urban areas and airports. This map is one of a series of three regional maps which show change in the extent of intrusion and the resulting fragmentation of the undisturbed countryside from the early 1960s to the early 1990s to 2007.

For purposes of comparison the maps from each period are based on current regional boundaries drawn from the Ordnance Survey Strategy (2006) dataset.

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Intrusion Map: West Midlands, early 1990s

A map showing the areas in the West Midlands region disturbed by the presence of noise and visual intrusion from major infrastructure such as motorways and A roads, urban areas and airports. This map is one of a series of three regional maps which show change in the extent of intrusion and the resulting fragmentation of the undisturbed countryside from the early 1960s to the early 1990s to 2007.

For purposes of comparison the maps from each period are based on current regional boundaries drawn from the Ordnance Survey Strategy (2006) dataset.

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Intrusion Map: Yorkshire and the Humber, 2007

A map showing the areas in the Yorkshire and the Humber region disturbed by the presence of noise and visual intrusion from major infrastructure such as motorways and A roads, urban areas and airports. This map is one of a series of three regional maps which show change in the extent of intrusion and the resulting fragmentation of the undisturbed countryside from the early 1960s to the early 1990s to 2007.

For purposes of comparison the maps from each period are based on current regional boundaries drawn from the Ordnance Survey Strategy (2006) dataset.

Read more...

Intrusion Map: Yorkshire and the Humber, early 1960s

A map showing the areas in the Yorkshire and the Humber region disturbed by the presence of noise and visual intrusion from major infrastructure such as motorways and A roads, urban areas and airports. This map is one of a series of three regional maps which show change in the extent of intrusion and the resulting fragmentation of the undisturbed countryside from the early 1960s to the early 1990s to 2007.

For purposes of comparison the maps from each period are based on current regional boundaries drawn from the Ordnance Survey Strategy (2006) dataset.

Read more...

Intrusion Map: Yorkshire and the Humber, early 1990s

A map showing the areas in the Yorkshire and the Humber region disturbed by the presence of noise and visual intrusion from major infrastructure such as motorways and A roads, urban areas and airports. This map is one of a series of three regional maps which show change in the extent of intrusion and the resulting fragmentation of the undisturbed countryside from the early 1960s to the early 1990s to 2007.

For purposes of comparison the maps from each period are based on current regional boundaries drawn from the Ordnance Survey Strategy (2006) dataset.

Read more...

Landlines: why we need a strategic approach to land

Our new pamphlet argues that the case for a national approach to land use is more pressing than ever by showing that England’s land is under an increasing multitude of pressures. The current, fragmentary approach to land use is failing to address the problems caused by often conflicting demands: environmental degradation, rising costs and harm to health and wellbeing.

The ‘Landlines’ pamphlet brings together a number of experts to argue for greater national coordination on land use, a longer term approach that can enhance both the environment and the economy. Architect Sir Terry Farrell, UK Committee on Climate Change Chair Lord Deben, and Chair of the Woodland Trust Baroness Young are among those who propose different national solutions for how we use our land.

Sir Terry Farrell CBE, architect and urban planner, said:

“The scale, complexity and seriousness of these issues mean we cannot any longer proceed as before, treating land as a disposable asset. We have now got to plan proactively for rapid and radical change.”

Download the report now.

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Landscapes for everyone: creating a better future

A shared vision of why we must treasure our landscapes and how Government can help

CPRE has been leading the development of ‘Landscapes for Everyone: Creating a Better Future’. It is supported by 33 organisations including the National Trust, the Campaign for National Parks, the Ramblers, the John Muir Trust, the Open Spaces Society, the British Mountaineering Council and the Landscape Institute. We have a shared vision of why our unique British landscapes should be better valued for the benefit of current and future generations and what Government action is needed to achieve this.

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Lie of the Land

This report sets the foundation for our work on landscape, providing a clear definition of what is meant by countryside character and describing how it can be promoted through recent policy developments. The report also provides powerful illustrations of the value of England’s diversity of landscapes.

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Lighting nuisance survey 2009/10: Report

The Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) and the British Astronomical Association’s Campaign for Dark Skies (CfDS) came together in late 2009 to run a survey about how light pollution is affecting people’s lives. Our survey revealed that the main culprits are road lighting, domestic security lighting, street lights that are more than five years old, businesses, sports grounds and supermarkets. Light pollution can diminish people's view of the night sky and for many people disturb their sleep with stray light shining through windows. We want to see better planning regulations to control lighting.

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